NALOXONE STATEWIDE STANDING ORDER

On December 9, 2016, the executive director of the Utah Department of Health signed a statewide standing order allowing pharmacists to dispense naloxone, without a prior prescription, to anyone at increased risk of experiencing or witnessing an opioid overdose by blocking the effects of opiates on the brain and restoring breathing in minutes.

During the 2016 General Legislative Session, Rep. Steve Eliason sponsored House Bill 240 Opiate Overdose Response Act, passed authorizing the Utah Department of Commerce and UDOH to implement a standing prescription drug order to dispense naloxone.

Having this statewide standing order in place will increase access to naloxone for the public.  To view the actual standing order, you may go to naloxone.utah.gov to learn more and to voluntarily enroll as a pharmacy acting under the standing order.

Preventing Prescription Drug Overdoses

 

When used properly, prescription drugs are an important and necessary component of pain management.  However, misuse of these medications can lead to serious legal and personal consequences, including health problems and even death.  Prescription drug overdoses are preventable through targeted intervention, effective policy, strategies, and stakeholder coordination.

During the years from 2009-2012, Carbon and Emery Counties had the highest rate of deaths from prescription pain medication overdoses.  Southeast Health Department is currently working on programs and edcuation funded by the Federal and State Governments. 

 

Naloxone effectively treats opioid and heroin overdoses.

For decades, research has shown that naloxone can be used to effectively treat opioid and heroin overdoses.  Naloxone is an inexpensive, fast-acting drug that when administered during an opioid overdose, blocks the effects of opiates on the brain and restores breathing within two to three minues of administration.  There is no potential for abuse and side effects are rare.  You cannot get "high" from using naloxone and it has no potential for misuse.

Research by the Utah Department of Health showed few people, including healthcare providers, were aware of Utah's current laws that allow physician to prescribe naloxone to someone at risk of an overdose or who cares for someone at risk of an overdose and administer naloxone withouth legal liability.  In addition, few knew that bystanders or "Good Samaritans" can report an overdose without fear of criminal prosecution for illegal possession of a controlled substance of illicit drug.  

To get a naloxone rescue kit, visit http://utahnaloxone.org.

Safe Disposal at Home
  • Do no flush, do not pour!

  • Take prescription drugs out of original containers.

  • Crush and mix all unused drugs with an undesirable substance such as used (wet) coffee grounds.

  • Throw container in the trash can on the same day the trash is collected.  This extra safety measure can help prevent accidental overdose by children and pets.

  • Conceal, remove, and destroy ALL identifying personal information (prescription label) from all medication containers before recycling them or throwing them away.

 
 
 

EASTERN UTAH HOPE SUMMIT

Was held on  February 20, 2018

The Eastern Utah Hope Summit  on  Opioid Misuse, Suicide Prevention was a huge success and well attended at the Jennifer Leavitt Center, CEU/Eastern Campus in Price, Utah.  Plans are already being made for the 2nd annual summit in 2019!

Conference sponsored by: Southeast Utah Health Dept., Hope Squad of Carbon & Emery  Counties, Four Corners Behavioral Health, Castleview Hospital

Safe Use
  • Monitor your medications and know where your prescription pain medications are at all times.

  • Keep track of how many prescription pain pills are in your bottle so you are immediately aware if any are missing.

  • Store prescription pain medications out of reach of kids, family, and guests.

  • Keep prescription pain pills in the original bottle with the label attached, and with the child-resistant cap secured.

  • Dispose of all unused and expired prescriptions pain medications properly.

  • Talk to your friends and family about safeguarding their medications and proper disposal.

  • Never take prescription pain medication that is not prescribed to you.

  • Never take your prescription pain medications more often or in higher doses than prescribed.

  • Never drink alcoholic beverages while taking prescription pain medications.

  • Never share your prescription pain medications with anyone.

  • Taking prescription pain medications with other depressants such as sleep aids, anti-anxiety medications, or cold medicines can be dangerous.

  • Properly dispose of all unused and expired prescription pain medications.

  • Tell your healthcare provider about ALL medicines and supplements you take.

Safe Storage

  • Store prescription pain medications out of reach of kids, family, and guests.

  • Know where your prescription pain medications are at all times.

  • Keep prescription pain pills in the original bottle with the label attached, and with the child-resistant cap secured.

  • Keep track of how many prescription pain pills are in your bottle so you are immediately aware if any are missing.

  • Dispose of all unused and expired prescription pain medications properly.

Safe Disposal 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

Address:
28 South 100 East
Price, UT 84501

bgarff@utah.gov
Tel: 435-637-3671
Fax: 435-637-1933

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