Preventing Illness

Clinics focus on vaccine-preventable diseases for children and adults including Diphtheria, Pertussis (Whooping Cough), Tetanus (Lock Jaw), Polio, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Haemophilus Influenza, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Typhoid, Chicken Pox, Meningococcal, Child & Adult Pneumonia, and Flu.

For more information on vaccines, vaccine-preventable diseases, and vaccine safety:  go to www.cdc.gov/vaccines/conversations

Immunization Exemptions

Individuals wishing to have a personal exemption waiver must schedule an appointment in advance and will be charged $25 per child.

Vaccine Information Statements

Do you have questions about specific vaccines? If so you can now download fact sheets on specific vaccines. Get your Vaccine Information Statements.

Immunization Clinic Hours

TB Tests must be done on Mondays or Tuesdays

Price Office

28 S 100 E
PO Box 800
Price, UT 84501
(435) 637-3671 • (435) 637-1933 Fax

Immunization Clinic Hours

Monday - Thursday
3:00 PM - 4:30PM

Must bring Personal ID for all services.

 

Castle Dale

25 W Main
Castle Dale, UT 84513
(435) 381-2252 • (435) 381-5635 Fax

Immunization Clinic Hours

Monday
3:00 - 4:30 AM

Walk-ins welcome or call ahead.

Must bring Personal ID for all services.

 

Moab Office

575 S. Kane Creek Blvd.
Moab, Utah 84532

(435) 259-5602 • (435) 259-7369 Fax

Immunization Clinic Hours

Monday

3:00 - 4:30 PM
Wednesday
3:00 - 4:30 PM 

Must bring Personal ID for all services.

 

School & Childcare Immunization Requirements

School-aged Children

The following vaccines are required for students entering Kindergarten:

 

5 DTP/DTaP/DT - 4 doses if 4th dose was given on/after the 4th birthday

4 Polio - 3 doses if 3rd dose was given on/after the 4th birthday

2 Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

3 Hepatitis B

2 Hepatitis A

2 Varicella (Chickenpox) - history of disease is acceptable, parent must sign verification statement on school immunizatio record

 

Seventh Grade Entry

The following vaccines are required for students entering seventh grade for 2017/2018.

 

1 Tdap

2 Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

3 Hepatitis B

2 Varicella (Chickenpox) - history of disease is acceptable, parent must sign verification statement on school immunization record

1 Meningococcal (Only Meningococcal vaccine given after 10 years of age is acceptable for 7th grad school entry)

4 Polio (3 doses, if 3rd dose was given on/after the 4th birthday)

2 Hepatitis A

5 DTaP/DT (4 doses of DTaP, if 4th dose given on/after the 4th birthday; 3 doses of Td, if starting series after age 7 years with a single dose of Tdap preferred as the first dose)

 

Early Childhood Programs

(Includes children in a licensed daycare center, nursery or preschool, childcare facility, family home care, or Head Start Program)

 

  • Diptheria

  • Tetanus

  • Pertussis

  • Measles

  • Mumps

  • Rubella

 

NOTE: Rotavirus and Influenza vaccines are recommended, but are not required for students in early childhood programs.

 

Children attending early childhood programs are required to be immunizaed appropriately for age.  This means a child has received all of the doses of each vaccine appropriate for the child's age.  Children should be immunized according to current immunization schedules.

  • Polio

  • Haemophilus Influenza Type B

  • Hepatitis A

  • Hepatitis B

  • Pneumococcal

  • Varicella (chickenpox)

Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective public health tools available for preventing disease and death.  They not only help protect vaccinated individuals, but also help protect entire communities by preventing and reducing the spread of infectious diseases.  Among children born during 1994-2013, vaccination will prevent an estimated 322 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths over the course of their lifetimes.

 

Because of the success of vaccines in preventing disease, parents may not have heard of some of today's vaccines or the serious diseases they prevent.  These diseases can be especially serious for infants and young children.  That is why it is important to follow the recommended immunization schedule to protect infants and children by providing immunity early in life,before they are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases.  Vaccine-preventable diseases still circulate in the United States and around the world, so continued vaccination is necessary to protect everyone from potential outbreaks.  Even when diseases are rare in the U.S., they can still be commonly transmitted in many parts of the world and brought into the country by unvaccinated individuals, putting unvaccinated people at risk. One example of the seriousness of vaccine-preventable diseases is the increase in measles cases and outbreaks that were reported in 2015. As of October 31, 2014, 603 people from 22 states in the U.S. have been reported as having measles.  This is the largest number of cases in the U.S. since measles was eliminated in 2000.

Address:
28 South 100 East
Price, UT 84501

bgarff@utah.gov
Tel: 435-637-3671
Fax: 435-637-1933

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