HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM

HEALTH INFORMATION

 
DIABETES
Diabetes Prevention:
5  Tips for taking control

Tweaking your lifestyle could be a big step towards diabetes prevention -- and it's never too late to start.  Consider these tips. 

 

When it compes to type 2 diabetes -- the most common type of diabetes -- prevention is a big deal.  It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, for example, if you're overweight or have a family history of the disease.  In the United States alone, experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expect diabetes to affect more than 48 million people by 2050. 

 

Tweaking your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention -- and it's never too late to start.  Diabetes prevention is as bsic as losing extra weight and eating more healthfully.  Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabets Association

 
Tip 1:  Get more physical activity

There are many benefits to regular physical activity. It can help you lose weight but even if it doesn't, it's still important to get off the couch. Whether you lose weight or not, physical activity lowers blood sugar and boosts your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range.

Research shows that both aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes, but the greatest benefits come from a fitness program that includes both.

 

Tip 2: Get plenty of fiber

It's rough, it's tough — and it may reduce the risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control. Fiber intake is also associated with a lower risk of heart disease. It may even promote weight loss by helping you feel full. Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts and seeds.

 

Tip 3:  Go for whole grains

Although it's not clear why, whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and ready-to-eat cereals. Look for the word "whole" on the package and among the first few items in the ingredient list.

 

Tip 4:  Lose extra weight

If you're overweight, diabetes prevention may hinge on weight loss. Every pound you lose can improve your health. And you may be surprised by how much. In one study, overweight adults who lost a modest amount of weight — 5 percent to 10 percent of initial body weight — and exercised regularly reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent over three years.

 

Tip 5:  Skip fad diets and make healthier choices

Low-carb, low-glycemic load or other fad diets may help you lose weight at first, but their effectiveness at preventing diabetes isn't known; nor are their long-term effects. And by excluding or strictly limiting a particular food group, you may be giving up essential nutrients. Instead, think variety and portion control as part of an overall healthy-eating plan.

SKIN CANCER PREVENTION
Melanoma 

 

 

 

 

Protecting your skin from the sun is a safe thing to do.  UV rays are a known carcinogen.  You may also likek to know that the sunscreen you use is as safe as possible.  These are the safest sunscreens available according to a 2010 report by the environmental working group.

It is currently estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.  Numbers like that make a world without skin cancer seem to be an impossible goal.  But it is in our reach.  Skin cancer is highly treatable when caught early.  The five-year survival rate for people whose melanoma is detected and treated before it spreads to the lymph noes is 98%.  Yet, sadly, one American dies from melanoma, the deadlilest form of skin cancer, almost every hour.  

 

We can make a difference by workiing together!  Help us spread the word and encourage others to prevent and detect skin cancer.  

 

for additional resources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATE OF UTAH DIABETES PROGRAM
Work in partnerships to improve the quality of life of all Utahans at risk for, or affected by, diabetes

 

The Utah Department of Health Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) has been funded since 1980 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

We work to:

  • Inform Utahans of the seriousness, symptoms, and risk factors of diabetes

  • Help Utahans with diabetes learn to control their diabetes and prevent complications

  • Increase awareness of methods to prevent type 2 diabetes in Utahans with impaired fasting glucose of impaired glucose tolerance

  • Decrease or delay complications due to unmanaged diabetes

  • Improve insurance coverage for Utahans with diabetes

  • Assure access to high quality diabetes education programs

  • Promote improved quality of medical care in local communities.

 

What we do:

  • Collect, analyze, and distribute regional and statewide Utah diabetes data

  • Certify diabetes self-management education programs

  • Partner with primary care providers and other health professionals

  • Partner with health insurance plans

  • Conduct diabetes public awareness campaigns

  • Offerdiabetes continuing education presentations for healthcare professionals

  • Develop, distribut, and promote "Utah Diabetes Practice Recommendations"

  • Provide diabetes management tools for professional

  • Collaborate with diabetes agencies and stakeholders in the community

  • Provide funding to community agencies for local diabetes activities

Make it a team effort

The American Diabetes Association recommends blood glucose screening for everyone age 45 and older who's overweight. If you're older than age 45 and at a normal weight, ask your doctor about earlier testing. Also ask your doctor about testing if you're younger than age 45 and overweight with one or more additional risk factors for type 2 diabetes — such as a sedentary lifestyle or a family history of diabetes.

 

Also share your concerns about diabetes prevention. Your doctor will applaud your efforts to keep diabetes at bay, and perhaps offer additional suggestions based on your medical history or other factors.

Could You Have Diabetes & Not Know It?

There are 20.8 million children and adults in the US with diabetes -- and nearly one-third of them (or 6.2 million people) do not know it! Take the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Risk Test to see if you are at risk for having or developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. If you are a member of one of these ethnic groups, you need to pay special attention to Diabetes Risk Test.

 

Every individual with diabetes deserves the highest standard of care and education.

Health Education Classes & Individual Counseling Available

Castleview Hospital (Carbon County)

435-637-4800

HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM

 
September is ..."Utah Family Meals Month, "National Childhood Obesity Month, and "National Fruit & Vegetables-More Matters Month"
Family Meals

Parents, want some help with meal time? Recruit the entire family to help!

  • They will feel proud to do their part in helping!

  • They are more likely to eat what they prepare!

  • Sharing will happen!

  • This allows access to healthier foods!

 

Q. I never feel like there is time for family meals.  What are some strategies for making family dinners happen?

 

Talk to your local health department to learn more about how to do family meals.

http://choosehealth.utah.gov/about-us/local-health-departments.php

 

Meals at Home

To start, grab a pencil and paper and list your favorite meals.  Get ideas at:

http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy eating/recipes.html

 

You might want to use SuperTracker:MyPlan for deciding your meals and set your weight goals.

 

Make a grocery list and include lots of vegetables (half a plate rule).

3 tips:

  • Check out the frozen food aisles for quick, low-calorie vegetable side dishes, by selecting cut green beans, sliced carrots, and other chopped vegetables.

  • Avoid the ones with added cream, butter, or cheese sauces as these ingredients can add calories.

  • use the microwave to save time by steaming vegetables.  Use a glass casserole dish with a lid with a little added water.  Tasty cooking and easy clean up!

 

Eating fewer calories doesn't necessarily mean eating less food.  To learn more, visit EatMore,WeighLess?  And see How to Use Fruits and Vegetables to Help Manage Your Weight

 

About 1 of every 5 (17%) of children in the United States are considered obese.
Families can help!

There are ways parents can help prevent obesity and support healthy growth in children.

Parents:

  • Is your child at a healthy weight?  Energy balance is important.  To achieve this balance, parents can make sure children eat the right amount of calories, limit daily screen time, and take part in regular physical activity.

  • Substitute higher nutrient, lower calorie foods such as fruit and vegetables in place of foods with higher-calorie ingredients.

  • Serve children fruit and vegetables at meals and as snacks.  Attend Farmer's Markets and allow children to pick their favorites.

  • Serve water as a no-calorie alternative to sugar-sweetened beverages.  Carry water bottles often.

  • Ask about programs for their children such as TOPStar - Targeting Obesity in Preschools and Child Care Settings.

 

Know your children's BMI; talk to a health professional about it.

https://nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx

 

Fruits and Veggies- More Matters Month

Change your dessert!  Try grilling fruits at your next cookout or backyard event.

http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/dont-forget-dessert-at-your-next-cookout/

 

For recipe ideas, check out:

http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/cooking-tips

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
TOBACCO PREVENTION & CONTROL
Stopping the spread of Big Tobacco

 

For years, tobacco has taken its toll on our friends, families, loved ones, communities, states, and our nation; to the tune of 1,200 lost lives every day. Our efforts are in tobacco prevention are to prevent the rising generation from using tobacco, helping those that want to, to quit, and protecting non tobacco users from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. Please take a look at the resources below or feel free to give us a call directly at

(435)-637-3671

 

Click here to stop the spread of tobacco to our children.


 
Quit Tobacco

 

There are more resources than ever available to aid people in kicking their addication for good, and we are  committed to making as many of those resources available.

 

We have resources tailored to both adults and teens looking to break the addiction cycle.

 

Adult Resources

Utah Tobacco Quit Line

 

The Utah Tobacco Quite Line (1-800-784-8669) provides Utah residents with free over the phone ono-on-one coaching.  Together you and your "quit coach" will develop a personal plan to help you quit once and for all.  Many individuals also qualify to receive a four week supply of their choice of nicotine gum or nicotine patch for FREE! 

 

Utah QuitLine

 

Don't want to quit alone?  Now you don't have to.  Go to www.utahquitnet.com and join thoussands from around the state and the nation.  Get suggestions from people who have quit successfully, and recieve 24-7 support in your quit attempt.  This service is 100% FREE!

 

Teen Resources

Ending Nicotine Dependence (END)

 

The Ending Nicotine Dependence program isdesigned specifically to assist teens in quiting their tobacco use.  The sooner teens try to quit after starting the better the chances they have to avoid becoming a life-long tobacco user.  The program builds skills and knowledge concerning tobacco use to help those who want to quit successfully.

 

Utah Tobacco Quit Line

The Utah Tobacco Quit Line provides Utah residents with free over the phone one on one counseling.  Together you and your "quit coach" will develop a personal planto hlep you quit once and for all.  The Quit Line can also satisfy court requirements for youth who have recieved a tobacco citation.  This service is completely confidential.

VIOLENCE AND INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAM
Injury in Utah

 

Injury is the leading cause of death for all Utah children and adults ages 1–44, and kills almost four people every day. On average every year in Utah:

 

  • 1,400 Utahns die as a result of an injury;

  • 10,900 Utahns are hospitalized for serious injuries; and

  • 176,600 Utahns are treated in emergency rooms because of injuries.

 

Injuries are divided into two main types: intentional and unintentional. Intentional injuries include those due to rape and sexual assault, domestic violence, and self-harm (suicide), while unintentional injuries include those that result from motor vehicle crashes, falls, drowning and bicycle crashes, to name a few. But, whether suffered in a car crash, a football game or a fall down the stairs, the fact is the vast majority of injuries are preventable.

 

The proper use of car seats and seatbelts, bicycle, skatebord and motorcycle helmets, and locking and unloading firearms would save thousands of lives every year.


 
Our Mission

 

The Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program is "a trusted and comprehensive resource for data related to violence and injury. Through education, this information helps promote partnerships and programs to prevent injuries and improve public health."

 

To accomplish our mission, we collaborate with many partners to:

 

  1. Collect injury data and conduct injury research.

  2. Conduct education to increase awareness of injury causes and prevention.

  3. Support legislation and enforcement efforts that reduce injury hazards and increase safe behaviors.

  4. Plan and implment community-based injury prevention programs and activities.

 

 

FALL PREVENTION
Some don't get back up

About 12,000 people die each year as a result of falls in the home, yard, or at work.

 

In the real world when you take a fall, you can't always jump up, brush yourself off, and go on as nothing happened. This is especially true as one becomes older.

 

As aging occurs, physical changes increase the likelihood of a fall and the seriousness of the consequences. Among those older than 85 years of age, 1 of every 10 falls at home produces a hip fracture. Of that group, 20% die within six months after the fall. The survival rate of an elderly person who breaks a hip is small.

 

Becoming aware of the problem and taking some precautions can significantly increase your chances of having a productive year without falling!

 
Outside Prevention
  • When walking out of doors, watch for steps that may be overgrown with weeds or grass.

  • It takes only a few seconds to move debris, trash, weeds, or other items in your path.  If they cause you a fall, you may spend several months recovering.

  • Sawdust thrown on top of an oily substance spill will help absorb the material.  Sweep it up quickly, then clean floor with detergent and water.  Don't let grease or oil buildup accumulate in your garage or other places people walk.

  • Throw sand on icy walkways during the winter.

 

Inside Prevention
  • Keep your floors clear of clutter, garbage, and other debris. 

  • Clean up spill right away, to avoid slipping on them later.

  • Keep your walkways clear and well lit.  Turn your lights on early in the evening to help you see clearly. 

HEALTH INFORMATION

HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM

HEALTH INFORMATION

DIABETES
Diabetes Prevention:
5  Tips for taking control

Tweaking your lifestyle could be a big step towards diabetes prevention -- and it's never too late to start.  Consider these tips. 

 

When it compes to type 2 diabetes -- the most common type of diabetes -- prevention is a big deal.  It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, for example, if you're overweight or have a family history of the disease.  In the United States alone, experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expect diabetes to affect more than 48 million people by 2050. 

 

Tweaking your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention -- and it's never too late to start.  Diabetes prevention is as bsic as losing extra weight and eating more healthy.  Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabets Association

 
Tip 1:  Get more physical activity

There are many benefits to regular physical activity. It can help you lose weight but even if it doesn't, it's still important to get off the couch. Whether you lose weight or not, physical activity lowers blood sugar and boosts your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range.

Research shows that both aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes, but the greatest benefits come from a fitness program that includes both.

 

Tip 2: Get plenty of fiber

It's rough, it's tough — and it may reduce the risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control. Fiber intake is also associated with a lower risk of heart disease. It may even promote weight loss by helping you feel full. Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, nuts and seeds.

 

Tip 3:  Go for whole grains

Although it's not clear why, whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and ready-to-eat cereals. Look for the word "whole" on the package and among the first few items in the ingredient list.

 

Tip 4:  Lose extra weight

If you're overweight, diabetes prevention may hinge on weight loss. Every pound you lose can improve your health. And you may be surprised by how much. In one study, overweight adults who lost a modest amount of weight — 5 percent to 10 percent of initial body weight — and exercised regularly reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent over three years.

 

Tip 5:  Skip fad diets and make healthier choices

Low-carb, low-glycemic load or other fad diets may help you lose weight at first, but their effectiveness at preventing diabetes isn't known; nor are their long-term effects. And by excluding or strictly limiting a particular food group, you may be giving up essential nutrients. Instead, think variety and portion control as part of an overall healthy-eating plan.

 
 
 

Suicide Prevention

QPR stands for Question, Persuade, and Refer - 3 simple steps that anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.  Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade, and refer someone to help. Southeast Health Department has employees trained in QPR.  Call 435-637-3671 with questions.

 

Find Behavorial Health Services
Utah Division of Mental Health and Substance Abuse
 
The Utah Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health (DSAMH) was created as Utah's substance abuse and mental health authority.  DSAMH overseees the publicly funded prevention and treatment system.  If you, a friend, or family member is struggling with a mental problem or a problem with alcohol, tobacco, or other drugs, there is help available.
 
SAMHSA National Helpline
1-800-662-HELP (4357)
TTY: 1-800-487-4889
 
Also known as the Treatment Referral Routing Service, this Helpline provides 24-hour free and confidential treatment referral and information about mental and/or substance use disorders, prevention, and recovery in English and Spanish.
 
Other Crisis Resources
Veterans Crisis Line
1-800-273-8255/Press 1
Test to 838255
 
Suicide Prevention Lifeline
 
1-800-273-8255
TTY 1-800-799-4889
 
 
 

For more information on the vaping-related lung injury outbreak in Utah visit: 

https://health.utah.gov/lung-disease-investigation.

 

To read the emergency administrative rule visit:

 https://health.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/R384-418.pdf

Address:
28 South 100 East
Price, UT 84501

bgarff@utah.gov
Tel: 435-637-3671
Fax: 435-637-1933

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